March 10, 2021 3 min read

A camping stove may seem like the easiest part of glamping. All you have to do is place it in your bell tent/glawning, right? There are much more pressing matters, like actually getting to the campsite, finding the perfect spot and pitching in all sorts of weather (fingers crossed for sun!). Throw a few logs in, light a match and Bob's your uncle…if you remembered your kindling and firelighters!

There are, in fact, a few things you’ll want to consider before using your portable wood burning stove at a campsite. Not to worry - these are very simple.

So, let’s go back to basics (cue music).

Lighting the fire

Firstly, what’s the best material to burn in your camping stove? We swear by kiln dried wood, the kind we use on our home wood-burner. One fuel that is also quite popular, and that many glawning stove customers use, is well-seasoned firewoods such as Lekto. They're extra dry, sustainably sourced and they can be a cheaper option compared to kiln dried wood.

However, you may want to scrap wood altogether and go down an eco-friendlier route now that more options are becoming available. If so, biofuel may be the choice for your camping stove since it emits fewer harmful carbon gases and reduces air pollution. Making this simple change could benefit the environment all around you. 

Our glawningGLOW woodburner is suitable for burning wood or biofuel, but we’d recommend avoiding coal; it burns too hot and can decrease the longevity of the stove. 

Before you light a fire always think safety first. We recommend having a small fire extinguisher, fire gloves, a fire blanket, a carbon monoxide detector, fire guard etc nearby for peace of mind.

Testing the camping stove out

Now you’ve chosen your source of fuel, and lit your stove…wait, take a step back. Make sure you’re testing your stove for the first time outside your tent/Glawning and light it up a few times before your trip. It’s common for some smoke to be produced with the first use as the paint cures, so it’s best to burn it outside and avoid creating the smoky tavern effect or leaving your tent with an ‘ash tray’ aroma.

 

Fireproof

So, we’ve covered fuel and pre-burning, what's next? Well…let’s work from the ground up. We recommend popping something under the camping stove to protect your lovely matting - our heat mat, a rug or barbecue mat would do the job well. Although the GlawningGLOW is designed to produce little downward heat, there's always a chance that a few hot embers will escape when you open the door to top up the fuel.

Some ‘glawners’ have had the ingenious idea of using a dog crate for stove safety. The base tray can be placed under the stove to protect the matting and the crate itself can double up as a fire guard around the stove to protect small kids and pets. 

 

The Flue

Okay, one last thing. 

Now that you’ve got your stove resting comfortably in your Glawning/bell tent, you’ve tested it out and all seems fine, it’s time to consider the chimney.

A flashing kit is first needed to finish installing the stove in your tent. All of the installation information for ‘cutting the hole’ is available on the website support pages. This includes easy to follow step-by-step directions and accompanying images to help you complete the task at hand. Since many glawning owners find this to be a daunting task, we have written a handy blog and created a video on the very topic of installing your flashing kit - you can read it here and watch our video.

Before you get stuck into fitting your flashing kit, you need to think about where to place your camping stove. You may have it tucked away at the side or placed right in the middle; each space has its own benefits. Placing the stove nearer to the side rather than in the centre leaves more space for the bed, especially if you have a smaller area to work with. However, placing it nearer to the centre provides a more even distribution of heat.  We talk more about stove positioning in our Flashing Kit blog to help you weigh up your priorities.  Don't forget to give your flue a regular clean to ensure optimum air flow – our professional hack is to shove a dirt cheap loo brush up the pipe....giving your tent a wide berth whilst doing so!

 

Finished!

Phew! Now sit back and relax with the warmth from the fire all around you, regardless of the weather. Crack open the beverages. Happy Glamping!

Psst...we’re rewarding you for making it this far with a sneak peak of our new window stove coming this summer:

 

 



Sarah Martin
Sarah Martin


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